Chinese & DPRK Train

Chinese & DPRK Train

Is it worth taking the train?

Taking the train in or out of the DPRK is a rich experience within itself. Not only will it give you time to mingle and chat amongst your tour group buddies or the local Chinese but you’ll have a high chance to meet North Koreans. With our experience North Koreans are very friendly and welcoming to tourists who are taking their time and spending money to travel to their country. Try not to be so surprised if they may want to offer you some snacks or beer!

The quick low down

The overnight train takes 24 hours to reach either destination with a stop and a train swap at Dandong station. Dandong is the city that borders the DPRK on the Chinese side.  Each passenger travelling with YPT is given a comfortable bed to sleep on within a shared cabin of six beds. Hot water is available on either side of the carriage for tea, coffee or noodles as well as toilets that are regularly cleaned by the friendly conductors. If you’re hungry or thirsty, food carts are wheeled down the corridor and are available at a cheap price. Those who want to pig out are welcomed to join the dining cart for a bigger meal or to have a drink at the bar.

What is it like entering and exiting the DPRK on the train?

It’s unreal and an experience not worth missing. The DPRK custom officers love a good laugh whilst they may inspect your luggage and belongings. It’s a very simple procedure that’s not too intrusive and most of the time they prefer to sit down with you to learn more about your country in playful broken English.

Important things to know

Unfortunately travellers using American passports aren’t able to take the train in or out of the DPRK. Also please make sure you have a Chinese entry visa. A Chinese 72 hour transfer visa is not accepted due to Chinese restrictions.

Wish to travel in style?

If you enjoy travelling by rail or more interested to see the countryside in further comfort; we can upgrade your ticket to a soft sleeper cabin. The term “soft sleeper” is an odd Chinese translated word for first class cabin. The beds are slightly wider, thicker mattress and pillow, a door to lock, western toilets, and there are four beds in the room instead of the standard six in hard sleeper. If you wish to upgrade please email us and we’ll notify you of the upgrade cost.

Please note: the soft sleeper option isn’t always available on the DPRK train so please ask us in advance and we’ll be happy to assist you.

traininside

 Hard Sleeper

insidetrainsoft

Soft Sleeper